Ivanka Trump’s $100 million made-in-Asia clothing line got a boost in early April when the Chinese government granted Donald Trump’s daughter with new trademarks. From the Associated Press:

On April 6, Ivanka Trump's company won provisional approval from the Chinese government for three new trademarks, giving it monopoly rights to sell Ivanka brand jewelry, bags and spa services in the world's second-largest economy. That night, the first daughter and her husband, Jared Kushner, sat next to the president of China and his wife for a steak and Dover sole dinner at Mar-a-Lago.

What a coincidence, right? The same day Ivanka Trump is rubbing elbows with the President of China and his wife, the Chinese government makes moves favorable to her company and her wallet. Needless to say, this is running into an ethically murky, swamp-like area:

Using the prestige of government service to build a brand is not illegal. But criminal conflict of interest law prohibits federal officials, like Trump and her husband, from participating in government matters that could impact their own financial interest or that of their spouse. Some argue that the more her business broadens its scope, the more it threatens to encroach on the ability of two trusted advisers to deliver credible counsel to the president on core issues like trade, intellectual property, and the value of the Chinese currency.

"Put the business on hold and stop trying to get trademarks while you're in government," advised Richard Painter, who served as chief White House ethics lawyer under George W. Bush.