Being a white supremacist may actually be the tamest of Steve Bannon's sins, if you want to compare his racism to his other activities as an alleged pornographer and meth lab operator at his rented house in Florida before he became involved with the Trump administration.  Award winning underwater cinematographer Lawrence Curtis rented the Miami house after Bannon vacated it. He developed insomnia, chest pains, dizziness, and other symptoms. He paid a company to come in and test the environment for toxic chemicals and found positive results for high levels of methamphetimine and cocaine. Curtis gave this interview to ShareBlue Media:

Curtis heard the same stories of porn, drugs, and debauchery over and over again.

“Each person gave accounts that the house was used to film pornography, had a constant flow of men, women — and even children — at the house and that blatant drug use was occurring at all hours of the night and day,” Curtis said.

At least five people told him tales of drug use and porn at the house.

Felix, a handyman who frequently worked on the property, told Curtis he had personally “witnessed women and men being filmed in the act.” He described the buckets of chemicals and bags of trash and rags he had to remove. He spent hours scrubbing the master bathtub, “which appeared melted by some form of acid.” Felix suspected the bathtub had been used for “making drugs.”

Curtis heard similar stories from the pest control service man.

“In fact,” Curtis said, “he did so in an almost gleeful and boastful manner.”

The pest control worker described witnessing drug use each time he came to the house, “even at early day hours.” He told Curtis it would blow his mind to know what “what went on in the house.”

An unnamed male tenant, he said, who was “a heavy set man,” [Steve Bannon?] offered him “girls for sex and/or drugs in lieu of payment,” but he never accepted because he could lose his job.

The un-named “heavy-set man” was apparently quite the terror. The oven range repairman flat out refused to come back on site until he received assurances that the previous tenants had moved out.

When Curtis opened the gate, the repairman said with seeming relief, “You aren’t him.” He proceeded to work on the range and also share his own horror stories about the previous tenants.

He told Curtis that on several occasions, when he would arrive to service the house, “the tenants would scream at him to leave and threatened him with violence.” At other times, when he was allowed into the house to perform work, he observed topless and naked men and women and the constant presence of drugs, which they would sometimes offer to him.

He told Curtis it was “the worst experience of his life” and that he “did not want anything to do with those ‘evil people.’”

“You have no idea what kind of evil stuff went on in the house,” he said.

Poor Curtis was later to find out that the house was literally toxic, but coming back from a film shoot in 2016 he found piles of bills and letters from the City of Miami and the Bank of Ireland, plus requests to speak to himself from the FBI and several journalists.

The house itself finally proved too much for Curtis and he moved out in May. Curtis is presently attempting to recover from the health problems that he incurred living in the house that Steve Bannon contaminated and then was thrown out of. A metaphor for his White House career perhaps?