It takes a special brand of something to turn the opposing presidential candidate's use of a private email address into a supposed nation-shaking scandal and then turn around and do this mere weeks afterwards.

Presidential son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner has corresponded with other administration officials about White House matters through a private email account set up during the transition last December, part of a larger pattern of Trump administration aides using personal email accounts for government business.

Kushner uses his private account alongside his official White House email account, sometimes trading emails with senior White House officials, outside advisers and others about media coverage, event planning and other subjects, according to four people familiar with the correspondence. POLITICO has seen and verified about two dozen emails.

Kushner's lawyer, who is extremely busy these days, says that "fewer than 100 emails" were exchanged on the account since January, which may be true or may be subject to revision at some future date. The problem, as with other cases of Trump administration officials using private email addresses, is that members of the White House are subject to the Presidential Records Act, requiring them to preserve and disclose those emails as documents of the sitting administration—documents which become available to the public after each administration leaves office. Kushner’s lawyer insists that Kushner has been forwarding those White House-related emails to be archived, but POLITICO “could not verify that.”

Kushner's representatives declined to detail the server or security measures on it. [...]

Kushner has been under scrutiny in the ongoing Russia probes, which have expanded to include potential obstruction of justice by the president and his aides since January, and Kushner’s private email traffic may also be of interest to FBI and congressional investigators.

Yes. Yes, we imagine it might be. But the most interesting part of all of this is that it was only weeks after a presidential primary in which Donald Trump and the entire Republican Party worked themselves into a froth over opponent Hillary Clinton’s email habits—only to see those supposed concerns vanish into the ether after election day.